Đang xử lý...
Lost in the Jungle (Sách tiếng Anh)

Lost in the Jungle (Sách tiếng Anh)

0
Giá bìa: 119,000 
Giá Phương Nam:119,000  (đã có VAT)
Tiết kiệm:0 ₫ (-0%)
Sản phẩm đã hết hàng
Thông tin Giao hàng & Khuyến mãi
- Nhận hàng tại:
Từ 1 đến 3 ngày, không kể Thứ 7 & CN.
Từ 2 đến 5 ngày, không kể Thứ 7 & CN.

- Miễn phí giao hàng toàn quốc cho đơn hàng từ 250.000 đ

- Miễn phí giao hàng tại TP.Hồ Chí Minh cho đơn hàng từ 150.000 đ

Bạn ngại đặt hàng trên website. Gọi 1900 6656, chúng tôi đặt hàng giúp bạn.

Lost in the Jungle

Picture a northern Vietnamese teen-age soldier imprisoned in a jungle cave watching frogs and rats being roasted on an open fire and you are immediately drawn into what can only be described as a very special if not unique story. What makes this tale such a gripping and at the same time significant one? There are at least two subjects to consider for the purpose of grasping it s importance. The first is the process around which this novel was written and something of its illustrious history. The second is coming to know and appreciate the Vietnamese author Pham Trung Dinh (pen-name Trung Trung Dinh) himself.

“Lost in the Jungle” has won a prestigious State Prize in Vietnam, one of two which its author Trung Trung Dinh has been awarded over the years. For the western reader this may constitute an appealing, but, on the other hand dubious, distinction. We don’t really quite yet ‘get’ the post-war “Socialist Republic of Viet Nam”. What does a State Prize from a “Communist” government signify? At a minimum we know there is recognition that the story is well told and has cultural, historical or social value. The current government of Viet Nam is big on rewarding personal ethics and contributions to one’s community or the common good. So let’s leave the reasons for the choice of a State Prize by a government so different from our own – is it really? – and concentrate instead on what we in the West might learn from this jungle tale and how its English version came about.

Most of us are in the dark when it comes to appreciating the arduous and creative tasks that go into the telling and translating of a chronicle of this kind. This is not a longish novel. Perhaps that is a good thing when you think of the effort that must go into translating lively Vietnamese prose into English. These are two very diverse languages, the first based so fundamentally on tonal qualities and perhaps closer to Chinese or even ancient Hebrew for its earthiness and concreteness. English is every bit as creative and versatile but much more linear and certainly much more forgiving or limited when it comes to number of tones in speech or as demonstrated in writing.

The Vietnamese version of this book has been out for almost a decade and the decision to bring it to a Western (English-speaking) audience was only reached a few months ago. But translating fiction is not an easy task. Legal documents and verbal explanations, in a court room for example, call for accuracy. “Just tell me exactly what the person has said and don’t give me any interpretation of the words or your opinions.” I’ve often had to say that to my own translators as I worked and traveled in Viet Nam. Translating story is quite different. One must labour both with the words but also with the creative ideas and neither one of these must be sacrificed to the other. It takes Dr. Gary Donovan, a specialist in both linguistics and the pedagogy of linguistics to patiently struggle with the rough English translation to bring out both a faithful rendering of the author’s words plus a meaningful expression of ideas in a totally dissimilar language-type. This is a different level or constituency of creative expression. It also takes the quiet genius of cultural appreciation plus a full knowledge of the Vietnamese language of celebrated short story writer McAmmond Nguyen Thi Tu to provide a level of insight into meaning both of words and ideas, culturally shaped as they inevitably are.

Consider something as simple as the title of this book “Lost in the Jungle”. Around a dinner table in Calgary, Canada with the author, Dr. Gary, Tu and husband David; or in the Volga Hotel in downtown Ha Noi, again with author Dinh, plus a distinguished professor – friend – writer – and army comrade, and myself: we all weigh the pros and cons of changing the title to properly reach a Western audience. Some of us argue that “Lost in the Jungle” sounds too much to our Western ears like an old Tarzan movie. Back in Canada, those working day and night on an accurate yet appealing translation hold tightly to a faithful rendering of the original. And what does “lost” signify? I, myself, listened while Dinh and his faithful colleague and professor of literature Nguyen Van Loi reiterated the importance of allowing the reader the right of determining what might be meant by that word and that title. And in the end simplicity and verity won the day. Now, you gentle reader, are left to supply your own interpretation of events, which is as it should be in any great literature and is certainly in keeping with Trung Trung Dinh’s intent.

One final comment on the substance of this story and its process serves as a convenient bridge to some words about Pham Trung Dinh, the man. This is a story which centres on very young soldiers. Perhaps the real strength and contribution of this narrative is that it is told innocently, candidly, sometimes confusedly, through the eyes and ears, ideas and fears, feelings and tears, of a very young and sensitive man. That man is as in all good fiction a compilation of real figures not the least of which is Trung Trung Dinh himself. If we take nothing else from this story I hope it will be a deep appreciation of the author’s capacity for re-imagining those days in his own life and the perceptive nature which enables and enhances the recall. In addition there is the determination (nine years of work) to tell this – his? – story to others.

Tác giả :

Thông Tin Chi Tiết
Công ty phát hành Nhà Sách Phương Nam
Nhà xuất bản NXB Hội Nhà Văn, Phương Nam Book
Trọng lượng vận chuyển 200 gr
Kích thước 13x21x0.9cm.
Số trang 150.
Ngày xuất bản tháng 08/2014. 
SKU 98898
Loại bìa Bìa mềm.

Khách hàng nhận xét

  • Đánh Giá Trung Bình

    0/5

    •  
      (0)
       
      (0)
       
      (0)
       
      (0)
       
      (0)
  • Nhận xét về sản phẩm
Viết nhận xét của bạn (chức năng này bắt buộc phải đăng nhập)
1. Đánh giá về sản phẩm này
  • Họ & tên của bạn
    hoặc đăng nhập để nhận xét và có cơ hội trúng thưởng
    2. Tiêu đề nhận xét (vui lòng gõ tiếng Việt có dấu)
    3. Nội dung nhận xét (vui lòng gõ tiếng Việt có dấu)
Nhận xét mới nhất

Thảo luận

Vận chuyển & giao hàng

  • Hotline
    1900 - 6656 Thứ 2 - Thứ 6: 8h - 16h30 Thứ 7: 8h - 12h, CN nghỉ

CÔNG BỐ GIẢI SÁCH...

vào lúc 04/10/2017

" LỄ CÔNG BỐ GIẢI SÁCH HAY..."

“Hôn tay đàn bà”–...

vào lúc 11/08/2017

" “Hôn tay đàn bà”– Mạc Thụy..."

Khai thác sức...

vào lúc 19/07/2017

" KHAI THÁC SỨC MẠNH TIỀM THỨC - KIM CHỈ..."

Nhasachphuongnam.com – Nhà Sách Trên Mạng.

Nhasachphuongnam.com ra đời vào tháng 12/2010 với hình thức kinh doanh Mua hàng online – Giao hàng tận nơi. Với mô hình nhà sách trên mạng, cho phép độc giả dễ dàng tìm sách & mua sách online. Đến nay nhasachphuongnam.com đã có hơn 70,000 đầu sách phục vụ cho độc giả cả nước. Chỉ cần truy cập website nhasachphuongnam.com và mua sách qua mạng, quý khách sẽ được giao sách tới tận nơi miễn phí khi đặt đơn hàng từ 150,000đ trong phạm vi Tp. Hồ Chí Minh & từ 250,000đ đối các tỉnh / thành phố khác.

  • Thanh toán an toàn tại
    nhasachphuongnam.com
  • Chứng nhận Sàn GD
    TMĐT